Here are some of the beautiful stills from my best friend Lorien’s amazing documentary about women in the construction trades, Hard Hatted Woman.

Please check out the KICKSTARTER (!!!), watch the trailer, and, most of all, share!

compulsivecartographer:

London. Made by the Russians during the Cold War.

compulsivecartographer:

London. Made by the Russians during the Cold War.

feuille-d-automne:

Franz Kafka , c.1910.
Via Getty Images 

"Kafka had the magic of actuality in even the most dislocated phrase that no other modern has, a kind of shiver + grinding blue ache in your teeth."
-Susan Sontag describes Kafka in volume one of her Journals (11/19/53)

feuille-d-automne:

Franz Kafka , c.1910.

Via Getty Images

"Kafka had the magic of actuality in even the most dislocated phrase that no other modern has, a kind of shiver + grinding blue ache in your teeth."

-Susan Sontag describes Kafka in volume one of her Journals (11/19/53)

publicdomainreview:

France in the year 2000… as imagined in the 19th century. A series of futuristic postcards by Jean-Marc Côté and other artists. See more here: http://bit.ly/LnSwOO

WHALE-BUS.

last wednesday was world suicide prevention day and

I found a boy who had shot himself in the campus parking lot. 

In a few hours, it will be one full week since that moment. Language does not often fail me, but I still have not figured out what to say. 

I intend to circumvent that supervening ghost—that which always trails its damp wings behind my glories … To use ones hands & eyes; to talk to people; to be a straw on the river, now & then—passive, not striving to say this is this. If one does not lie back & sum up & say to the moment, this very moment, stay you are so fair, what will be one’s gain, dying? No: stay this moment. No one ever says that enough. Always hurry. I am now going in, to see L. & say stay this moment.

—Virginia Woolf, December 31, 1932, The Diary of Virginia Woolf Volume Four

and their absences were no more noticed
than were those of the unreturning birds
each spring until there were no words at all
for what was gone but it was always so
I have no way of telling what I miss
I am the only one who misses it

—From The Moon Before Morning by W.S. Merwin, reviewed for The Rumpus by Camden Avery (via therumpus)

Pigeons in World War I:  ”This shows inside the corner of a corrugated iron shed. Two pigeons are standing on perches and a third bird is sitting in a roost. Both of the standing birds are missing a leg. The army horses, messenger dogs and carrier pigeons were very vulnerable, not only to enemy fire, but also to gas and to disease.
It seems odd that, in the middle of the carnage in which so many men died, wounded pigeons were being treated. However, they could still be used for breeding and were, therefore, a valuable resource.
[Original reads: ‘OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPH TAKEN ON THE BRITISH WESTERN FRONT IN FRANCE. British army carrier pigeons in France. Hospital for wounded carrier pigeons in France. These birds have lost a leg but managed to get through with their messages.’]” (by National Library of Scotland)
The National Library of Scotland’s flickr has the most fascinating and informative photo captions. All archives should aspire to their standard.

Pigeons in World War I:  ”This shows inside the corner of a corrugated iron shed. Two pigeons are standing on perches and a third bird is sitting in a roost. Both of the standing birds are missing a leg. The army horses, messenger dogs and carrier pigeons were very vulnerable, not only to enemy fire, but also to gas and to disease.

It seems odd that, in the middle of the carnage in which so many men died, wounded pigeons were being treated. However, they could still be used for breeding and were, therefore, a valuable resource.

[Original reads: ‘OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPH TAKEN ON THE BRITISH WESTERN FRONT IN FRANCE. British army carrier pigeons in France. Hospital for wounded carrier pigeons in France. These birds have lost a leg but managed to get through with their messages.’]” (by National Library of Scotland)

The National Library of Scotland’s flickr has the most fascinating and informative photo captions. All archives should aspire to their standard.

myousa:

#30. Officially, the end of the Monster Challenge. The theme today was “favorite monster”. 
I grew up watching Godzilla. My brother and I would spend days having massive marathons of everything we could get our hands on. Heisei Godzilla (1985-1995) is the best Godzilla, and I will fight you over that, internet.
I wish the paper wasn’t so crinkly, but I don’t know how to fix that. 

I would wear this if it were a t-shirt — I like the crinkle texture, too.
Also, yes, alive, surprisingly? I do not know why I am such a vanishing, antisocial beast; I hate it about myself. I would love to see you and K soon — I’m writing to her tonight. 

myousa:

#30. Officially, the end of the Monster Challenge. The theme today was “favorite monster”. 

I grew up watching Godzilla. My brother and I would spend days having massive marathons of everything we could get our hands on. Heisei Godzilla (1985-1995) is the best Godzilla, and I will fight you over that, internet.

I wish the paper wasn’t so crinkly, but I don’t know how to fix that. 

I would wear this if it were a t-shirt — I like the crinkle texture, too.

Also, yes, alive, surprisingly? I do not know why I am such a vanishing, antisocial beast; I hate it about myself. I would love to see you and K soon — I’m writing to her tonight. 

This summer was the summer of Melville. Watched this with my younger brother, who is a film naif but happily loved this one, the first french film he’d ever seen. He was gratifying impressed when I pointed out the (obvious—sorry, brother!) dice motif in the set design.

This summer was the summer of Melville. Watched this with my younger brother, who is a film naif but happily loved this one, the first french film he’d ever seen. He was gratifying impressed when I pointed out the (obvious—sorry, brother!) dice motif in the set design.

(Source: )

wonderfulambiguity:

André Kertész, Greenwich Village, New York (woman reading in fire escape window), 1963

Summertime, essentially.

wonderfulambiguity:

André Kertész, Greenwich Village, New York (woman reading in fire escape window), 1963

Summertime, essentially.

YPRES - SHELL SHATTERED CITY FLANDERS 1916 Main Title (IWM 206)

You should absolutely click through and watch this video taken in Ypres in 1916. Stay to the end to see British soldiers playing with puppies found abandoned in the ruins of the cathedral. Recall: World War I was just a hundred years ago.

ca. 1935 (via Visual Culture and Public Health Posters - Infectious Disease - Fight tuberculosis with modern weapons)

Here’s the original poster and last shot of Edwin S. Porter’s 1903 film The Great Train Robbery, widely considered the first narrative western (via).

Carson McCullers

she died of alcoholism

wrapped in a blanket
on a deck chair
on an ocean
steamer. 

all her books of
terrified loneliness 

all her books about
the cruelty
of loveless love 

were all that was left
of her 

as the strolling vacationer
discovered her body 

notified the captain 

and she was quickly dispatched
to somewhere else
on the ship 

as everything
continued just
as
she had written it 

-Charles Bukowski